Walk Through The Web Wednesday 4/13

siamese cat on a leash walking through a garden

Hello Furiends,
We had a near disaster at our house this week and rather than writing about it I thought I’d tell you the story in photos.

The Great Chewy Debacle

It all started when Oliver realized the food bowls were empty

“Oh Meowza, we are in danger, Human come here at once!”

He marched himself to the pantry to assess the situation.

“Look in there, it’s practically empty!”

The Human tried to calm Oliver down, explaining that she would put in an order to Chewy. I, being the “take charge” kind of feline I am marched into the office to check on the progress of said order.

“Let’s see here, how do I get to the screen with the Chewy order? The lack of opposable thumbs really makes this kind of stuff hard!”
“Human, are you sure you sent this order?”

The Human (using a tone that we felt was a bit snarky and disrespectful) said yes, she did send in the order and no one would starve.

“Are you sure we’re not going to starve? Oliver says we are going to starve.”

The Human spent the rest of the day reassuring us that starvation will not happen but, as the hours passed, we felines decide we need to have a back up plan.

“If need be, I can whip up some feline Sushi.”
“And this sassy so and so might tide us over if we’re in a bind.”

After the first day passed and there was no sign of a chewy box, The Tribe realized that they would need to step up the pressure.

“Excuse me Human, while you’re up may we discuss the Chewy order?” “Oliver, I’m only up because you launched all of your 20 pounds on me and woke me up and NO, I will not discuss the Chewy order at 3:00am.”

We knew we could not let up.

“Good morning Human. You might want to check that Chewy order oh, and you may want to take a little more time with your makeup, you’re looking a little rough this morning.”

I felt it was quite rude that she mumbled something under her breath and stomped out of the room.

“Um. good morning Human. You know you could take that coffee into the office and check on the Chewy order.”

Then came that magical day when the doorbell rang and a loud thump was heard on the porch. We sat and watched The Human wrangle the heavy box inside. When she managed to get the box on the kitchen counter to make it easier to unpack, I arrived as Chief Snoopervisor.

“Boy are you lucky Human, this got here just in time. Feels like the order is correct.”

After I commandeered the box for the appropriate amount of time, I stepped away so she could take out the contents. Once she was done, I investigated the inside of the box.

Once the contents of the box and the box itself had been approved, The Tribe did a happy dance, confident in the knowledge that we’d managed to avoid starvation. Let this be a lesson to the humans belonging to all our furiends, “Stay on top of the Chewy order!”

Well, that was the drama we endured this week in our neck of the woods. I hope your week was drama free. Now let’s get on to this week’s feline news.

Turkey’s graceful Van cats give birth to 2022’s first kittens

The Turkish Van is an elegant feline and is noted for it’s pure white body and distinctive eyes. And these felines are cared for in the  Van Yüzüncü Yıl University (YYÜ), Van Cat Research and Application Center where they are taken under protection. A total of 23 mother cats and their 60 kittens reside in special rooms.

Last month, YYÜ Van Cat Research Center participated in the “Van Cat Beauty Contest” with two cats out of a total of 32 Van cats in the competition. Mia, with blue and green eyes, took home the first-place medal. It sounds like these cats have it made!

Cat food with activated AIM protein launched

Jasmine

This is a topic near and dear to our hearts. Our Angel Jasmine dealt with kidney disease for many years and The Human gave her SubQ fluids and medication regularly. Now, cats may benefit from a dietary supplement and a drug that will both allow the protein AIM (apoptosis inhibitor of macrophage) to properly clean and expel waste matter in a cat’s kidneys that is being combined in a cat food.

The food (named AIM30), which recently came out, and the veterinary medicine, expected in 2023 pending successful 2022 clinical trials and government approval, are the byproducts of Japanese immunologist Professor Toru Miyazaki’s decades of work on AIM, a protein which, when not properly activated, contributes to kidney problems in cats.

Miyazaki, a professor specializing in disease biology and immunology at the University of Tokyo’s Graduate School of Medicine, discovered AIM protein in the1990s. His goal was to study AIM to treat human disease, but he also became very interested in feline AIM. He now has plans to leave his teaching career at the University of Tokyo so he can focus on AIM research at the nonprofit he intends to establish, the Institute for AIM Medicine.

AIM, also known as CD5-like (CD5L), is described as a secreted protein that can help identify and destroy dead cells and other debris in the body. Miyazaki’s research found that AIM attaches itself to IgM [immunoglobulin M] antibodies and from there proceeds to clean the body of waste and debris. 

In September 2021, Miyazaki ran into funding problems because of the COVID-19 pandemic. With the success of feline AIM research at stake, thousands of Japanese cat lovers came to the rescue by sending almost US$2 million in donations to the University of Tokyo so Miyazaki’s work could continue. 

Realizing the impact his team’s work would have on so many lives, Miyazaki tapped a new pharmaceutical company as partner to speed up development of a prototype drug and start a clinical trial for felines with kidney problems. The drug’s efficacy will be assessed six months after trial and, if successful, will be subject to government approval. 

“I hope that ultimately veterinarians will give (cats) one or two jabs every year like vaccines,” Miyazaki told AFPBB News, the Japanese affiliate of AFP. 

Meanwhile, Miyazaki’s team and an unnamed pet food company worked to produce a cat food with the AIM protein in stable condition. Miyazaki said what works for humans as far as using dietary supplements with activated AIM protein also works in cats. The cat supplement, which will activate the non-functional AIM in the cat’s blood, promises to prevent kidney disease when mixed in cats’ food from the time they’re kittens.

The AIM-based therapeutic drug and food supplement for cats are expected to prolong cats’ lives by doubling their current life expectancy of roughly 15 years by promoting healthy renal function. Now that would be pawsome!

Slip-purrs! Cat becomes a social media star after owner makes him shoes made out of his own FUR

A cat went viral after his owner made slippers for him out of his fur and shared a photo online.

Minira, the one-year-old Minuet breed, lives with his owner in Japan and has racked up 85,000 YouTube subscribers with clips of his adorable antics. 

He also has thousands of fans on Twitter and Instagram.  In one recent post, his owner, who is not named, showed how she made Minira a pair of slippers out of she collects during his regular brushing.

‘Cat Daddies’ documentary

Men who love cats are manly men. Mye Hoang, a Los Angeles-based producer and director who’s earned writing and directing awards for several films, created a  new documentary “Cat Daddies.” The film’s goal isn’t so much to convince everyone to love cats, but to debunk myths of cats and the humans who love them.

 “Cat Daddies,” is scheduled to screen at Long Beach’s indie Art Theatre on Retro Row on Saturday, April 16. The event will be a fundraiser for Long Beach cat rescue The Little Lion Foundation (scroll down to Great Furballs of Fun).

“I think men have always been conditioned to love dogs over cats—this is further perpetuated by the images we see in movies and TV in the past, and from jokes about the ‘crazy cat lady,’ which I hope is going out of fashion,” Hoang said. “We see that changing now with social media and the internet—everyone has a camera at home, and we can see more authentic footage of how cats behave.”

Hoang herself said that she observed her husband transform from meh-on-meowsers into a staunch cat guy after they adopted their first cat. “He seemed to grow into a softer, more patient and compassionate person,” she said. “This inspired me to find more men who had undergone a similar transformation and document their stories.”

“Cat Daddies”’s pivotal character is David Giovanni, a disabled, unhoused person living in New York City with his beautiful brown tabby, Lucky. Both are determined to remain together despite a devastating medical diagnosis for David and an uncertain transitional housing status for him thanks to the COVID-19 pandemic. Interspersed throughout David’s narrative are a crew of firefighters who successfully snuck a stray cat into the fire station, an actor and social-media influencer, a buffed and tatted stuntman, a truck driver, a Bay Area tech worker and a teacher whose cat becomes an Instagram sensation.

Cat Daddies through the years have embraced the joys and challenges of living with us felines. Mark Twain’s cats knocked his inkwells off the table and batted at the clacking bars on his typewriter. Ernest Hemingway loved cats; descendants of his many-toed polydactyls still live happily at his former home on Key West.. Ricky Gervais’ moggies appear frequently on his social media pages.   

 “The film may not convert everyone to love cats, but I hope seeing images of men caring for these little creatures wins over a few skeptics and becomes a catalyst for compassionate change,” Hoang said. Pun intended, surely.

And Speaking of Cat Daddies….

And speaking of Cat Daddies, a video of a man was shared in Reddit’s “Made Me Smile” forum on Tuesday by an anonymous poster under the name u/SnooCupcakes8607. The post has since generated more than 42,000 upvotes and over 500 comments from Redditors who declared the man the “best cat dad ever.”

The post also highlights one of the many ways in which cats show their affection for their owners—by cuddling up to them.

“After saving the kitties he won’t go anywhere without them anymore,” wrote u/SnooCupcakes8607 in the post’s title.

The video opens with the man walking into his bedroom while wearing a bathrobe with two front pockets, each of which contains a kitten. When the man approaches his bed, one of the kittens quickly jumps out of his pocket, but the other decides to stay put.

“Alexander don’t want to get out,” he said to the camera, referring to the one kitten still sitting in his bathrobe.

In the next frame, Alexander—who is still in the man’s pocket—stares up at the man as he brushes his teeth. Alexander stretches his paws up and lets out a big yawn, and in response, his owner absentmindedly reaches down and strokes one of his paws.

Needless to say, thousands of humans have been charmed by these pocket kittens and a few female humans are wondering where they can find a cat daddy like this!

Walk Through The Web Wednesday 4/28

siamese cat on a leash walking through a garden

Hello There Furiends!
I hope things are nice and springy in your neck of the woods. It is lovely and spring is definitely springing in our neck of the woods but The Human is having some issues with this. She has watery eyes and a runny nose every day and calls this strange condition “allergies”. With humans being so fearful about everything these days she said she feels like wearing a sign around her neck that says “It’s only seasonal allergies” when she goes out. She says these allergy thingys are because of these notices she gets almost every day.

I must say that this feline is a bit flummoxed as to how a text alert can make a human’s eyes water and nose run!

Oliver and I are still suffering through the dreaded D-I-E-T. The Human is not only reducing our kibble to near starvation levels, she’s also trying to make us exercise. Oh the pain and humiliation! I believe The Human is secretly feeding skinny Lily but so far I’ve not been able to catch her in the act.

As for Oliver and I, we purrfer to be couch (or bed) potatoes) and now Oliver has joined me in our evening “cat TV” watching sessions.

Now that Oliver has horned in to my TV time, I find I have to burrow under the bed covers just to get some alone time.

“Yes Human, what was so important that you had to interrupt my nap?”

The Human gushed this week when she came home and saw this sight.

“No it wasn’t a cuddle. I just came over here to rest my eyes. I didn’t realize Lily was on the sofa too.”

Well, enough about us, let’s get to this week’s web news.

Feline CKD sees new treatment possibility

As many of you know, our Angel Jasmine suffered from kidney disease in her last few years of life. We have many furiends who have this disease as well and the news that there may be a promising treatment for this makes me want to jump up and yell “WHOOPEE!”

The article I found said that  a novel cell-derived molecular therapy might offer a promising approach to treating chronic kidney disease (CKD) in cats.

Piedmont Animal Health and The Wake Forest Institute for Regenerative Medicine (WFIRM) is currently evaluating the intrarenal injection of a recombinant human chemokine (CXCL-12) to treat feline kidney fibrosis. (Phew, that was a “sciency” mouthful!)

Preclinical studies have so far indicated that the therapy has the ability to restore normal kidney structure in cats with clinically induced fibrosis. These studies have also provided evidence as to how the treatment acts to address changes in the kidney that can be associated with CKD damage.

And, a subsequent clinical pilot study demonstrates the feasibility of administering CXCL-12 with no obvious side effects over a nine-month study period.

CKD is a progressive and debilitating condition common in older cats. There are currently no available treatments for the reversal of its effects. The Human gave Jasmine sub-Q fluids every other day and Scruffy Paws Kidney Vitalize chews as well as a kidney diet. These things helped keep her kidney numbers safe but did not cure the disease.

Imagine how happy the human was to read,  “These preclinical and clinical study findings suggest our first collaboration could make a big difference in the lives of cat owners and their beloved pets,” says Piedmont’s chief scientific officer, Doug Hepler, PhD. “Anyone who has had a cat with chronic kidney disease knows how heartbreaking it is to watch their decline and be able to do very little about it. Our goal is to change that story to a much more positive one.”

What wonderful news this is and we are purraying that this new therapy would work to treat early kidney disease for all our furiends! For those of you who are interested in the study, you can read it here.

Pedigree cats seized in raid find new home

Two of the confiscated kitties

Oh my whiskers, I’ve heard of raids on human’s homes but normally the police find contraband….not cats!

The Thai police made a drug raid on a home and in addition to drugs they found… felines. They decided to auction the six cats (five Scottish Folds and one Bengal) and thankfully the auction winner was Nutch Prasopsin, who runs a Facebook page followed by 3 million cat lovers. Those cat lovers helped her raise the 100,000 bahts ($3186.00) winning bid for the kitties.

“I was very excited. I had very much hoped that the cats would end up in my care. I’ve been following their status since the very first day,” she told reporters.

The auction was held after a 30-day window expired for the owner, who remains at large, to come forward and claim the cats and prove they were not purchased with drug money. The confiscated cats will share their new home with Nutch’s 20 other cats.

The regional narcotics control board said the cats had suffered an ordeal and it was important they be auctioned off as a group.

“They were living together so they would be familiar with each other,” she said. “If we separate them, this may cause them stress or have psychological effects.”

The money generated at the auction will be held by police as a seized asset. I sure hope they take that asset and donate it to help kitties in Thailand!

The Kitty Convict Project

The Female Human and her sister have run a local lost and found pet page in our community for a number of years and when it comes to cats, if I’ve heard them say it once, I’ve heard them say it 100 times, “Think Lost, Not Stray!”

The innovative idea of the orange collar is to identify an indoor cat who is found outside as an “escapee”.  The Kitty Convict folks say, “it brands your indoor cat as a convict… it signals to the people of the world that your cat belongs inside.”

The Kitty Convict Project says in the US more than 7 million pets go missing every year. Of those, 26 percent of missing dogs and less than 5 percent of lost cats are reported and returned home.

The good folks at Dr. Elsey’s (makers of one of the the world’s best solution for felines with “litter box issues”, Cat Attract, are promoting the Kitty Convict orange collar program. They want to see your indoor cat posing in his or her orange collar! Share it on Instagram using #orangeinside™ for a chance to win a one-year supply of Dr. Elsey’s Ultra cat litter.

Where do you get such a collar? This is the one that Kitty Convicts recommends.  We have instructed The Human to order us 3 collars post-haste and will be modeling them for you in the future. But you don’t have to be fancy. Any reflective orange collar will identify you as a “Kitty Convict Project” kitty and get you home sooner!

How to tell if the cat you’ve found is a stray or someone’s pet

While we’re on the topic of lost cats, the Berkshire Humane Society published an excellent article about how to tell strays kitties from lost kitties.

We don’t want to shame all you well meaning folks who pick up cats you see outside and shuffle them to the shelter but we do want to remind you that many of these felines have homes. Now, if they were all Convict Kitty Project purrticipants with orange collars, it would be so much easier!

If you see a cat that  you might think is a stray without an orange collar, here are some signs that the cat is just visiting and has a home to return to:

 The cat confidently roams around in the middle of the day

The cat appears clean and healthy

The cat does not search for food

If these apply, the cat likely belongs to someone. However, you should always try to confirm this. You can post flyers or take a photo and post to your local social media lost pet finder organization. Another thing to do is to make a paper collar (about ¾” wide) and close it with tape. Write a message on the collar like,  “Am I yours? Please call (your name & phone number).” This will show the owner that someone is concerned.

Many local veterinarians and animal shelters will scan cats for a microchip, free of charge. If the cat is microchipped with current registration, an owner can be contacted immediately.

If the cat is hiding, scared, looks dirty or disheveled, is hungry or appears in any way to be injured or distressed, do not wait to get help.

If your cat doesn’t come home, don’t wait. Begin looking for them immediately. Post flyers, post photos and information on social media, search on foot and call local veterinary hospitals, animal control officers and rescue groups.

San Marcos, TX couple makes board game with internet cats

CATastrophe: A Game of 9 Lives will be available for preorder via the crowdfunding website Kickstarter on May 4th, 2021.

CATastrophe is a 2-6 player family board game as unpredictable as cats themselves. It features iconic cats from around the world such as Cole and Marmalade, Molly Happiness, Hosico and many more. Backers of the Kickstarter program have a chance to get their own felines featured in the game. There is also a tribute to Lil Bub, who passed away in 2019.

The game’s goal is to be top cat and has enough strategy and luck to make it fun. Each player starts with nine lives. The last cat standing is the winner.

The CATastrophe team includes cat illustrator Jenny Parks (Star Trek Cats book, Marvel National Cat Day Covers) and board game illustrator Jacqui Davis (Ex Libris, Euphoria).

Now if you’ll excuse me, I’m sending The Human over to the Kickstater site to see what it will take to get us featured in the game!

Jasmine Opines on Thankful Thursday

Hello Furiends,
I’m so thankful that I am feeling great and being the little Diva I am known to be. My kidney numbers were lower than when I was first diagnosed almost two years ago, The Female Human got me this pawsome cat tree and I’ve been running around like a crazy kitty and making it to the very top. It’s also a great place to watch squirrel fights or deer trying to figure out how to get in the garden.

I hope your Thursday is purrfectly wonderful and that you have a lot to be thankful for.

Purrs & Head Bonks,

Jasmine Opines About Scruffy Paws Kidney-Vitalize Chews

Before I tell you the story about my experience with Scruffy Paws Kidney Revitalize chews I must turn this portion of my blog post over to our legal department.



This is a sponsored post by Scruffy Paws. As a happy customer of Scruffy Paws, I was contacted to write a sponsored post from my (and the Female Human’s) experiences with the product. All reviews and opinions expressed in this post are based on my purrsonal views and experience with the product.

It’s No Fun Getting Old



I know you might find this hard to believe but I am a 17-year old feline. I’ve been healthy all my life until about 15 months ago when I suddenly lost a lot of weight (and for a tiny feline like me this is a very bad thing). The Female Human took me to our vet and I was diagnosed with kidney disease. I wrote about my kidney diagnosis in my post “Jasmine’s Journey” if you want to read more. 

Sometimes You Have to Do Your Own Research

The Female Human began reading all she could about kidney disease because she doesn’t just want to keep the disease at bay; she wants me to live my best life. Sub-Q fluids (every other day) and prescription kidney food (wet) are my staples but felt there was more she could do. Her research brought her to a wonderful company called Scruffy Paws Nutrition. The first thing she noticed was the vast amount of feline CKD (chronic kidney disease) information the company offered. She then read about the company itself and how they got started by seeking solutions for their own kitties. They created, with the help of science, veterinary professionals, feline experts and nutritionists are the Scruffy Paws Kidney-Vitalize chews that I’ve been taking for over a year now. And they don’t just address feline kidney issues, they also offer products for UT wellness, hip and joint vitalization, hairball control, dental powder and multi health bites. Meowza, these people are serious about feline health!

The Female Human learned much about CKD from the emails she received and by the information Scruffy Paws offers on their website.  They have an e-book about CKD and a course you can take to learn more about Chronic Kidney Disease. Now this is all too scientific for this feline. I’ll let my human do the research. I’m just interested in how I feel and how the stuff tastes and I give both a paws up.

Paws Up award by FelineOpines.net for humans who do amazing things for cats

But Will She Eat Them??

The Female Human is a bit skeptical about “medicinal” chews and treats. The Tribe of Five learned long ago that pill pockets contain….pills, and that is just not going to happen.  She’s had some fur raising experiences with my brother, Tucker, who takes medications. Add the fact that I too am a very finicky feline and she wasn’t too hopeful that I’d eat the treats. Still, she decided it was worth a try so she ordered the Scruffy Paws Kidney Vitalize Chews and crossed her fingers.

“Hurry up Human and give my my Scruffy Paws Kidney-Revitalize treat!”
-Jasmine

The first time I was introduced to these chews I looked at The Human with suspicion thinking, “This is a trick, what horrible tasting medicine is she trying to feed me?” She placed the chew at my feet like an offering and slowly backed away. I squinted up at her then turned my attention to the intriguing smell of the item in front of me. I sniffed, pawed it a bit and then decided, “This smells good enough to eat!” And eat it I did, and I now look forward to my morning and evening chew treat. Who knew?

How Does This Stuff Work?

This little feline is getting her mojo back after taking the chews for about a year. I am keeping my weight on, playing with my toys again and being my sassy self.  Although the Female Human is very careful about my diet and religious about giving me fluids, she believes that the Scruffy Paws chews are an important part of my ongoing health.  So, what is it about this magical product that makes it work so well? We felines aren’t that interested in science but I know your humans probably are so I had our Purrsonal Assistant do some research.

Some of the magic is in the active ingredients of Astragalus Root Extract and Rehmannia Root Extract. Both are proven to be effective, not only eliminating the symptoms of CKD but are also helpful in preventing it. (So you younger kitties, tell your humans to get you on this supplement as a preventative measure). The inactive ingredients of Carob, catnip, chicken, chicken Liver, coconut glycerin, coconut oil, garbanzo flour, mixed tocopherols, palm fruit oil, pea flour, rosemary extract, sorbic acid, and sunflower lecithin all add to make the chews effective and tasty.

Scruffy Paws Nutrition Makes Your Human’s Life Easy

Aside from the important fact that these chews keep me living my best life, the company gives our humans peace of mind too. Shipping is always free and there is a money back guarantee for all their products. And, if you order larger sizes of the chews you save money too.

The Proof Is In the Picture

The photo on the left is me at 6 years of age. The one on the right is of me today at 17. As I am a rather vain little kitty I am very pleased that Scruffy Paws Nutrition has helped me retain my youthful looks.  

My Human and I are so happy we’ve found Scruffy Paws Nutrition and we didn’t just find an awesome help for my health, we also found a community that cares passionately about felines and their humans. I hope you humans look into this fantastic company.

Purrs & Head Bonks,

How Dare You Call My Cat Geriatric! (The Female Human Opines)

Although I didn’t say the words out loud that‘s exactly what I thought all those years ago when my beloved Miss P was being examined by the vet. I struggled to paste a smile on my face as I gazed into the blue eyes of my sassy Lynx Point feline. Granted, she was 10 years old but she still looked like the sassy little kitten I’d first met. The kitten who began life as “Puddy” but let me know in no uncertain terms that she required a more dignified moniker and soon became known as Miss P.

My beautiful sassy angel, Miss P.

Miss P was with me for nine more wonderful years and during that time I began to learn to not only accept the geriatric time of her life but to embrace and enjoy it. She’s been gone for five years now and I am happy to say every memory I have of her is a joyful one.

A year and a half ago my world was rocked when 17-year old Jasmine was diagnosed with kidney disease. I immediately went to the worst case scenario, my heart was broken and tears flowed so fast couldn’t concentrate on the lesson the vet tech was attempting to give me in administering subcutaneous fluids. Then, something the vet tech said permeated my fog of sorrow.

“Anita, we’ve had so many kitties live many good years with this diagnosis on sub-Q fluids.”

I grabbed a tissue, blew my nose and said hopefully, “Really?”

Their Senior Years Are Only A New Stage

That was the moment I turned the corner and began to embrace the reality of my cat’s senior days.  I thought through Jasmine’s treatment and felt that no matter how hard it would be for me to give her the fluids, she deserved much better than being terrified by a vet trip every other day.  I screwed up my courage and learned how to administer the fluids myself. We discussed what Jasmine needed and how to monitor her health. I left the vets that day with prescription food, sub-Q fluids and a hopeful heart.

It took a few weeks to get Jasmine stable. We made one more vet trip when she seemed to be in distress but we managed to get her back on track. I monitor her weight, give her fluids religiously (although she has some issues with this as seen in this short video) and make sure she’s hydrated and her diet is low in phosphates.  Instead of bemoaning the fact that she’s a senior I take the time to create new rituals and fun times together. Now, while I give her fluids, she also gets an Inaba Churu Grain-Free Chicken lickable treat and despite her meows to the contrary, she enjoys the new addition to the treatment.

“I do not appreicate being poked with a needle!
Jasmine

It’s natural to want our felines to remain kittens forever but if we don’t embrace all their stages of life we miss so much. Tucker, Jasmines brother, Jasmine and I have developed routines and ways of living together over these 17 years that are a constant blessing to me. Yes, there are adjustments. Tucker can no longer come out on the deck with me and sit on the railing as his poor depth perception has made him more tentative in gauging how much space he has on that ledge. There is a 35 foot drop into the woods from that ledge that he already misjudged a number of years ago so now he and all the cats enjoy the great outdoors in their pop up catio.

Tucker, in his younger days, sunning on the ledge of the upstairs deck.

Jasmine went through a stressful time of bullying and, as a result, she now lives in the bedroom suite. I tried to reintegrate her into the rest of the house for several years but I finally had to respect her wishes to have her own space. Since the arrival of my “foster failures” Alberto and Oliver, she does have periodic visitors and enjoys bossing them around.  I constantly look for other ways to enrich her environment as well.

Tucker’ has always been a rather “laid back” fellow which is only enhanced in his senior years. Still, there are things he does that delight and often amaze me. He likes to jump up on the stools at the kitchen counter and then hop up on the counter to “snoopervise” the goings on in the kitchen (he is a cat that lives to eat and this  proclivity for eating seems to have been enhanced over the years). I would never dream of chasing him off the counter. If the old guy can make it up there, he deserves to stay there. Any visitors to my house have to deal with the fact that the counter is religiously cleaned with cat-friendly disinfectant and is often decorated by a rather large, cross-eyed feline. He has also been known to enjoy box sitting sessions and giving the “young ones” the occasional whacky paw when he deems them to be annoying. Tucker makes sure he never misses an opportunity to roll in some nip as well..

A little “nip” sprinkled on the counter will always get this old guy moving. Look at that happy face.

Granted, life and routines change over time but that doesn’t mean the changes are bad. Many are quite enjoyable. As you navigate the senior years of your cat, consider these five lessons for living with and loving geriatric felines that I’ve learned.

The Five Rules For Your Cats Geriatric Years

  1. Plan financially for your cat’s senior years. As they age, cats will require more veterinary visits than they did as young felines. Think about getting pet insurance when they’re young or, start a savings plan for their medical needs. I have a line item in my budget for “Cat Medical”. Whatever I don’t use in a month, I put in savings as insurance.
  2. Make sure you begin a habit of yearly wellness exams for your cats. Wellness exams help your vet identify and treat potential problems at their earliest stages.
  3. Have a first class pet sitter. If I have to leave home, I need more than someone who will come in and feed twice a day. Both Tucker and Jasmine have medical needs that must be addressed and medications that need to be dispensed. My sitter needs to know what to look for if the cats are not feeling well and when to take them to the vet. I always make arrangements with my vet before I leave in case my cats need medical attention.
  4. Just because they aren’t as active as they used to be doesn’t mean they don’t need environmental enrichment. Tucker enjoys box sitting and catnip is still a favorite.Jasmine has an assortment of toys and enjoys the occasional roll in the nip too.
  5. Love them and enjoy them and be thankful for every day you have with them.

Charles Dickens said, “What greater gift than the love of a cat?” and if we can receive that love for 19, 20 or more years, what a wonderful gift that is.

Jasmine Opines On Take Your Cat To The Vet Day

Hi There Furiends,
Jasmine here. I am talking to you about this important day because I’ve been seeing quite of bit of the folks in white coats the last few weeks. Even though The Female Human takes us all to that place every year for wellness exams, sometimes things still happen. In my case I became very sick and was diagnosed with kidney disease. The Humans are giving me sub-cutaneous fluid every other day and antibiotics and I am beginning to feel better and am putting on a little weight.

You say, when you go to the vet for regular wellness visits they have information that makes it easier to diagnose you and to help you. Even though I’m a lady kitty a bit advanced in years, my vet, and yours, can help you to be your most healthy self. Please make at least a yearly wellness visit to your vet!
Purrs & Head Bonks,

Jasmine